How Japanese Music Changed My Life - Pt 1 / by Storyaboutagirl

“So I can’t lie to music, ‘Cause that would mean I’m lying to myself, I myself is music…” -Koki Tanaka (Ex-KAT-TUN), “PIERROT”

“So I can’t lie to music, ‘Cause that would mean I’m lying to myself, I myself is music…” -Koki Tanaka (Ex-KAT-TUN), “PIERROT”

Music has always been a part of my life.  I can’t honestly remember a time when I’ve been without it.  However, it wasn’t until about eight years ago that I introduced myself to Japanese music, almost accidentally.

“Sure chigai isogu tabi ni, butsuke ai chigire au, tagai no hanae no itami kanjiteiru, sabishi sa ni yogoreta ude de daita.” -T.M. Revolution, “Invoke” 

“Sure chigai isogu tabi ni, butsuke ai chigire au, tagai no hanae no itami kanjiteiru, sabishi sa ni yogoreta ude de daita.” -T.M. Revolution, “Invoke” 

Whilst, like many others, music is very important to me I’ve found that I sometimes puzzle people when it comes to the songs I like, and it’s not just because my taste is a little varied.  My favourite songs tend to be those with lyrics I can identify with and for the most part if I don’t like the lyrics to a song then it follows that usually I can’t stand listening to it, even if the melody is pretty good.

However, when I started listening to Japanese music it became a little difficult.  After all, if you don’t understand the language of the music you are listening to then you can’t understand the lyrics.  But, for some reason it didn’t seem to matter so much with Japanese music.  There was still something that moved me and indeed, the first musician I started listening to believes this too.  

I introduced myself to T.M. Revolution quite by accident.  He sang the first opening theme to Gundam Seed, the very first anime I seriously watched and for days I couldn’t get “Invoke” out of my head.  I bought all the CDs I could get my hands on in the UK, watched his videos and researched him as much as I could.  It was through this research that I found an interview, in which he talked about his love of British music and how even if you don’t understand the lyrics to a song you can still be moved by it.  What matters are the feelings conveyed by the singer.  I still feel this way.  Although, as my Japanese improves I have begun to understand more and often challenge myself to translate the lyrics to my favourite songs...

Part 2 coming soon...